Visions 4 Change

Celebrating your visions for change as we work to build a better community

July 4, 2020

Shared visions

About

In July of 2020, we invited our community to share their Visions for Change in an online forum using #TPAVisions4Change. We received 49 amazing submissions. You can find these visions by searching #TPAVisions4Change on Facebook, you can also see many of the visions by scrolling down on The Production Alliance Facebook page. Out of these 49 submissions we randomly selected 3 winners for our Olympic Baskets of Abundance.

In addition to sharing visions, we also gave participants the options of supporting one of our partner organizations as an entry into the Olympic Basket drawing. To learn more about our partners visit their websites below:

Jefferson County Anti-Racist Fund - jcarf.org/

Jefferson County Black Lives Matter - www.jcblm.org


Vision Winners

Congratulations to Roarke Jennings, Amanda Funaro and Chelsy Iorio for winning our beautiful Olympic Baskets of Abundance!!!

Here are their visions:

Roarke Jennings:

Our town thrives upon its own resources and lives in a truly non-violent way. We become cooperative creators now that we’ve seen the destruction of consumerism. As a true ‘sanctuary city’, everyone is empowered to thrive here as long as they contribute to the well-being of our community and environment.

Amanda Funaro:

A world filled with love and tolerance. If we stay curious, speak our hopes and fears, see and be seen - from there, we can build a better future. AND I recognize the necessity of our collective willingness to wade in discomfort... it’s such a strange invitation. Will you join me?

Chelsy Iorio:

My vision has most of the food we use to be locally grown and raised using biodynamic and regenerative agriculture, so that we not only are not avoiding detrimental inputs in producing food, but we are also using beneficial and regenerative inputs to actively build the health of our food-growing ecosystems. This makes the food dense in nutrients and makes the organisms we're raising resistant to disease and pests while also increasing the productivity of the ecosystem. What can't be sourced locally is minimal but done so sustainably and ethically and with the same regenerative methods. With this model, our food becomes nourishing to our bodies, but also nourishing to the environment in which its grown and also lucrative to the people who grow it. The wealth from selling the food is kept within the community.



All Visions

Here is a list of all the Visions 4 Change that were shared via email and facebook. This does not include the videos and art that was shared.

Sarah Fitch

Preservation of space where nature thrives and creatively blooms is invaluable. Though my sons have gone before me, my property is filled with happy spirit. Here is a place of sanctuary alive with art ,music and animals. My vision is that my community through a trust will keep this dream alive.

Owen Rowe

A town where no one *needs* to own a car. Build complete neighborhoods where anyone can walk or bike to work, shops, services, and recreation. Develop 24/7, fairly-priced transit, taxi, and delivery services. Provide vehicle shares for occasional use. Families, forests, wildlife, and watershed all enjoy a safe, quiet town!

Chas Allen

1) My Vision for Change within our community would be to create a resource of mentorship, where life skills, are listed and are made available to not only our youth but to all those interested... through hands on sharing to build upon a strong community foundation for generations to come!

2) "My Vision for Change paints a world of COLORS that blends all the beauty of this existence into a single brush stroke of PEACE... where LOVE is the unlimited palette with which we draw our inspiration. TOGETHER, we are all artists that paint this masterpiece. World Unity Creates Universal ABUNDANCE."

Katherine Baril

1) next year is the 150the anniversary of the US Cavalry burning down Quatay village and destroying the local Tribal settlement- I am interested in seeing if there is any interest/ possibility of the County returning the land which we can Memorial Field back to the Tribes for restoration and management. . . the deed giving it to the County was clearly clouded by illegally seizing it from the Tribes— then we have the Chinese downtown burned out- while the Port Townsend fire engines couldn’t get from City Hall to Memorial Field to protect the residents and businesses— we call it memorial field?for WW1 and WW11 but for whose wars and I thinkas a major downtown green space there are so many options that the Tribes could lead in recovering that area— could still be a sports field but not with that fence and not with storyline- time to make it right.

2) also the opportunity presented by the City owned land at the golf course- the third course in our little county- it only returns about $24,000 a year to the City coffers and is a tremendous once in a generation opportunity to rethink those acres and connecting corridor to something like the Park blocks in Portland or Central Park in New York- a large contiguous public space for multiple uses— for example. connect mtn view, the golf course, John collingwood farm and wrap it around to the Fairgrounds and North Beach— it could be a Farm School of national reputation with small acreage farms doing innovative regenerative farm research and training- it could be modeled after the Intervale Farm School in Burlington Vermont which employs master farmers and trains about 20 new farmers a year with the food production going to schools and food banks to ensure local resilience- it could have small farm worker/ young family housing on the edges but maintain the farm- floodplain for future climate events and food resilience.

3) look at this landscape as a system and you’ll see the opportunity to also connect the golf course and farm School to the Fairgrounds - also owned free and clear by the County- no major new investments- and one option to turn it into a maker campus and use all the small buildings for incubator space— or frankly the City could develop parcels for low income housing walkable to schools and parks while taking the revenue from that development and putting it into an account to buy prime farm land in the valley and invite WSU to build an agriculture/ grain research center. . in the heart of the valley- across from Finn River (e.g. Glen Dale farm) and build farm work housing near the business and agriculture innovation center.

Charles Law

What if we were a maritime peninsula so abundant that we were a hub for exporters not importers? Our newly built cargo sailing ships would cover the sound.

Jude Rubin

Very strong vision for a new pledge of allegiance; We occupy land of the Coast Salish people: Port Gamble S’Klallam, Jamestown S’Klallam, Lower Elwha S’Klallam, and Skokomish tribes, who retain legal hunting and gathering rights in their Usual and Accustomed Areas. We honor Native cultures and traditions, rooted here since the beginning of time.

Roarke Jennings

1) Our town thrives upon its own resources and lives in a truly non-violent way. We become cooperative creators now that we’ve seen the destruction of consumerism. As a true ‘sanctuary city’, everyone is empowered to thrive here as long as they contribute to the well-being of our community and environment.

2) Public funds are used to improve social equality and environmental stewardship rather than uphold the status quo. Together we develop the tools and infrastructure needed to shake off the shackles of the large-scale centralized system, and come to rely on each other again.

3) Closed loops: Gardens and gardens, beehives, fishers and bakers. Bike mechanics, artists and all kinds of makers. Festivals, music, and dance; give spiritual growth a chance. Biodiesel buses and plenty of houses. Love enough for all with the pulses. The courageous stewards of Jefferson County rejoice.

Maria Mendes and Jo Blair

1) Place-based, self-sufficient and sustainable community with dignity and respect for all members. One that follows principles including respect for all beings, people, animals, plants and responsibility for Mother Earth and her lands, waters and the air we breathe. Also, look outside our current ways of thinking that generated the crisis.

2) Before making decisions consider the impacts on the 7th generation. A community that studies and implements anti-racism.

More restorative justice work, such as Native Connections’ work on the číčməhán Trail with the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe and other potential projects in collaboration with a variety of groups in our community.

3) My vision is that we abide by a new Declaration of Independence and it would begin like this: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all beings, all life, is created equal, and that every being, plant, animal, earth, is endowed by Divine Providence, with not only unalienable rights such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, but also the guarantee of health and abundance that was innately given to each upon birth unto this planet, as well as the Earth, herself.

The Maitlands

In our community I would like to see a more inclusive conversation on how we best nourish the spirit of the future of those currently growing up in our community. Cultivating a multigenerational approach that weighs equally services & support to all demographics not just those that are highest in represented numbers. #childrenandfamies

Grace Love

Stop performative behavior, if you’re gonna be a resource to the communities that at are hurting get dirty in the soil with us.

Help redistribute wealth in creative ways

Land, and agriculture wealth is important. Money sent to Black businesses is critical.

Make space at the table, in government, in social situations such as board members within local structures. Let us (BIOPIC) speak without interruptions

Tomoki Sage

Tumbling over the fire. The sun dipping low. TPA asking for visions of change. Big changes feel difficult and scary sometimes. Growing pains. Here we are. Still growing. Still evolving. Revolving. I'd like to see a reality in which we put more of a precedence on listening, learning new things, effort, enjoyment, passion... And also more fun @ Port Townsend, Washington

Heidi Eisenhouer

As a 40 year resident of Port Hadlock, my love for Jefferson County is reinforced by decades living in this place we call home - immersed in the people, land & waters around us. Like you, I treasure what we have here in Jefferson County, but the reality is that our future is going to look different than any of us expected just a few months ago. We’re living in unprecedented times.My vision is about communication and collaboration. It’s time to get creative and resourceful. We need to be open to learning new ways of being, new ways of doing things. We need to talk and listen to people we normally don’t talk to. It’s not optional. We need to work more hours than we ever thought we could. We need to laugh and cry together. This is our community. I look forward to working with you - resourcefully and creatively - to build a more resilient community for the future - even if we’re six feet apart with masks on. It’s going to take all of us rowing together to get through the waters ahead. I look forward to traveling those miles with you.

Laura Indi Gassland-Tatro

1) I imagine yards sprouting victory gardens, with legal tiny houses and ADUs. Children would be laughing and playing with elders, not worrying about hunger, disease, homelessness, police brutality or being "safe" in front of a screen. We would share tools, and knowledge to build, grow and create what we need.

2) What if everyone saw wearing a mask as an act of love and strength?

3) I imagine building opportunities so any children who wished could stay in the place they grew up.

Nakaia Eliza

Sharing tools, seeking knowledge, always learning new practices, trades, and ways of looking at the world through art, collaboration, and a deep respect for the planet. Being vibrant. Embracing new technology and staying engaged inter-generationally. Allowing yourself to make peace with your old Self as you learn who your new Self is becoming.

Chelsy Iorio

1) My vision has most of the food we use to be locally grown and raised using biodynamic and regenerative agriculture, so that we not only are not avoiding detrimental inputs in producing food, but we are also using beneficial and regenerative inputs to actively build the health of our food-growing ecosystems. This makes the food dense in nutrients and makes the organisms we're raising resistant to disease and pests while also increasing the productivity of the ecosystem. What can't be sourced locally is minimal but done so sustainably and ethically and with the same regenerative methods. With this model, our food becomes nourishing to our bodies, but also nourishing to the environment in which its grown and also lucrative to the people who grow it. The wealth from selling the food is kept within the community.

2) My vision puts people and compassion over profits. For-profit prisons which benefit from unpaid or cheaply paid prisoner labor (aka slavery) are replaced with rehabilitation facilities which offer legitimately criminally convicted people (ie not someone who got caught driving with a suspended license, etc) rehabilitative services like mental health care, education, and job training. Indigenous people's and people of color are rehabilitated from their generational trauma and oppression and are no longer targeted and profiled as criminals and are truly free and equal to everyone else. We free the asylum seekers from their cages and reunite all the children with their parents and provide them with plenty of therapy to process their trauma, and they get placed in homes where they are safe. Women are no longer oppressed and abused and patriarchy becomes only a memory. Everyone has plenty of opportunities for work with fair wages and healthcare becomes free. The Healthcare system is also overhauled to work for people and not for big pharma and medical companies. Alternative methods which work become widespread in lieu of harmful pharmaceuticals when possible, but our diet and lifestyle factors change to minimize the presence of disease in the first place. Our military budget is drastically reduced so that our resources go to taking care of the people at home and we pose nor receive any military threats to/from anyone and the world lives in peace.

3) Climate change is reversed using various carbon sequestration methods and all power is generated from renewable resources. Toxic chemicals which would pollute waterways disappear and we make widespread use of water-saving technologies to conserve freshwater resources. Everyone learns how to compost food and yard waste as well as human waste. Toilets become a thing of the past and everyone uses composting toilets. Deforestation and desertification end because we use things like hemp fiber to replace wood products. The air becomes clean to breathe, water becomes clean to drink, and our food and cosmetic products are no longer polluted with harmful chemicals and elements. Wildlife habitats are preserved because people use land space more wisely and humans learn to live in better harmony with the non-human world.

Amanda Funaro

A world filled with love and tolerance. If we stay curious, speak our hopes and fears, see and be seen - from there, we can build a better future. AND I recognize the necessity of our collective willingness to wade in discomfort... it’s such a strange invitation. Will you join me?

Jon Garrison

1) What would Facebook look like in real life if it was a weekly event? Part open mic, part mini presentations about something worth sharing? The group could be organized via a normal Facebook group, and people could propose topics during the week. The most liked items get to be presented in person at the next meeting. Despite a lot of the negative views of Facebook increasing social discord it is an important organizing tool in small towns. Maybe we can overcome the strife by meeting face to face. FaceToFaceBook? Let's figure out how to build social networks in real life? My grandparents told me about it, it sounds great.

2) Steph and I had this idea a few years ago when we were biking regularly on the Larry Scott Trail between Mill Rd and Thomas St. There are a number of stretches like that on the Larry Scott that have forest on both sides of the trail. The idea is to create a bicycle main street, with businesses focused towards the bike trail. Businesses like a general store, a restaurant/bar and a local crafts gallery would be a great core to a neighborhood of tiny houses in the surrounding forest with all paths entering on to the Larry Scott. The tiny houses would provide affordable housing and convenient access to people working in Port Townsend. The bike main street neighborhood would also be a great destination for people visiting Port Townsend, parking their cars in or near the port and biking up to the neighborhood to enjoy the restaurant and stores there. Bikes!!!

Lisa Flanders

a new fabric, needs to be reimagined, woven with, reverence, respect, wisdom, compassion, and love

Teddy LaChapelle

My vision for change can be easily summarized by suggesting the world be far more compassionate and empathetic. Consider social injustice toward BIPOC, LGBTQ, and women as wrong. The way we treat the environment as wrong. Change is needed. Everyone can be better. Empathy and love is the start.

Allison Barrett

1) I want white people in this country to experience the deep pain of racism as a personal affront on their own spiritual, emotional and mental sovereignty and work to dismantle white supremacy like they are saving their own lives.

2) I want to see the Port Townsend golf course returned to prairie and Kah Tai to North Beach connected by a wetland wildlife corridor.

3) I want to see the preservation and flourishing survival of all languages on the planet, especially the ones that are perilously close to being lost.

Cameron Withey

For the Quimper Peninsula, I envision an ‘Earth-Tenders’ Union’, where people who grow plants & animals, make natural products, eat food, restore habitat, or are otherwise connected to regenerative practices, build power and culture locally in solidarity with kindred BIPOC efforts around the country & world. Grow and share this abundance!





Baskets

Win one of three "Olympic Baskets of Abundance" 

Each submission is included in our contest with your chance to win an “Olympic Basket of Abundance” with a variety of goodies from businesses across the Olympic Peninsula. 

OLYMPIC BASKETS OF ABUNDANCE feature donations from our amazing community of artists, entrepreneurs and local businesses.  

  • Key to the City Bottle Opener Pete Langley
  • Sugar Hill Farms Fudge
  • Set of BBQ Tools
  • Truffleman Truffles
  • Keely Krow Ka - Music and Jewelry
  • The Cellar Door Gift Certificate
  • Mountain Spirit Herbals
  • Lehanies Chocolate
  • Karen Stillwell Yoga Classes
  • Family Portrait & printing by David Conklin
  • Propolis Brewery Gift Box
  • Kelly Grace Body Work
  • Katherine Macomber Millman - Long Distance Healing Session
  • Holly Carlson - Rose Theatre Tickets
  • Jessica Wedmore - Handmade Cloth Masks
  • Drum Lessons with Angie Tabor
  • Dozens of Tamales from Heidi Eisenhour
  • Farmers Market Tokens
  • Box of Finnriver Cider
  • Hilltop Tavern Gift Certificate
  • Small Engine Repair from Papa’s
  • Bike Repair from the Recyclery
  • Port Townsend Vineyards Wine